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Mason: Great Commission should not become ‘great omission’
Archie Mason, senior pastor, Central Baptist Church, Jonesboro, presented a message on the Great Commission in the Tuesday afternoon session of the Arkansas Baptist State Convention Annual Meeting Oct. 23 at Central Baptist Church, Jonesboro. Photo by Margaret Colson

Mason: Great Commission should not become ‘great omission’

Oct 23, 2018

Margaret Colson
Arkansas Baptist News


JONESBORO — Archie Mason, senior pastor, Central Baptist Church, Jonesboro, presented a message on the Great Commission in the Tuesday afternoon session of the Arkansas Baptist State Convention Annual Meeting Oct. 23 at Central Baptist Church, Jonesboro.

He told attendees not to allow the Great Commission of Jesus Christ, found in Matthew 28:16-20, to become the great omission in their churches. “We don’t have a Great Commission culture; we have a great omission culture,” he said.

“We get in the church and do some good stuff, but we forget the main thing. We can forget that Jesus said, ‘I have come to seek and save that which was lost.’

“Today is great preparation for us to go back to the churches we serve with a brand new fire lit in our heart and lit in our soul to see people come to the saving knowledge of Jesus Christ.

“God’s heart is on the world. Is our heart on the world?”

Trust power of Jesus

Mason’s first point was to “trust in the power of Jesus.” He then asked, “Do we really understand Who we serve?” Through Jesus’ “I am” passages in the New Testament, He was saying He was God, Mason explained, meaning that Jesus has all power and authority.

Mason encouraged attendees to bring “the biggest” sinners to their churches on Sunday mornings because the “gospel is the power of God that sets them free. It’s not us setting them free; it’s our Savior.

“Sometimes we preach like we do not believe what we preach. It’s a supernatural message that we share.”
God has called His Church to go, to make disciples and to send out believers to the world, he said. “It’s His church. Are we operating according to how He told us to operate?” Mason asked.

Statistics in Southern Baptist churches may indicate that churches are not following Jesus’ directive.
Mason examined the experience of Moses in the Old Testament when God told him to pick up his staff and it became a snake, which Moses threw down. “To create a Great Commission culture, there are some things we’re going to have to throw down in faith,” he said.

Mason said in a Southern Baptist church, “We will vote not to do evangelism. What is wrong with us? That’s what God called us to do.”

Obey purpose of God

Mason’s second point was to “obey the purpose of God.” He encouraged those present to cast vision, teach about multiplication and send people out.

“You got to paint the picture not of what could be but what should be,” he said.

Central Baptist Church, Jonesboro, recently sent out 250 of its members to start a new church. As those members left Central Baptist, $10,000 per week – half a million dollars a year -- “walked out the door to Paragould.” In 11 Sundays, the new church has baptized 64 people.

“This is not my church. This church belongs to Jesus Christ. God is moving and working and we can stay huddled up, loving the good things, and miss out on the main thing He’s doing.”
Experience presence of God

Mason’s third point was that Christians will “experience the presence of God” if they obey the purpose of God.

“We have a great opportunity to be a part of the greatest movement of God that your generation and my generation has ever seen,” he said.

Mason said he is trusting God to bring new members to the church. “God will fill this place back up” and replace the $10,000 per week.

“If you keep the main thing the main thing, you just sit back and watch the power of God. You just hang on and ride the train.”

Contact Margaret Colson at margaret@arkansasbaptist.org.

 

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